Saturday, January 14, 2006

correspondence

Older individuals often live a considerable distance from family and friends. In these instances, when frequent visits are not possible, cards, letters, cassette tapes. and phone calls are very meaningful. These should be sent or made on a regular basis.
Letters written in a chatty fashion that tell of experiences or recall past shared events can awaken memories and give the older person vitality. Correspondence should be positive. Although the writer must occasionally include tragic or disappointing news, he or she should avoid irrelevant gloom and doom. Cards and notes from friends, and religious and social organizations are often appreciated.
The White House, with volunteer help, is now sending birthday greetings to people 80 years or older, and anniversary greetings to couples married 50 years or more. Requests can be sent with the older person's name and address, 30 days before the birthday or anniversary date, to:
Greetings Office
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
Washington, DC 20500
See also CONSISTENCY; VISITING, TO HOMEBOUND AND INSTITUTIONALIZED ELDERLY.
Gillies, J. A Guide to Caring for and Coping With Aging Parents. Nashville: Thomas Nelson
Publishers, 1981.

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