Sunday, January 15, 2006

Polynesians

The Polynesians have a traditional diet of breadfruit, taro, pulaka, fish, and coconut, with chicken and pork on special occasions. Their major sources of activity are farming, canoe building and fishing. Fifty-six percent of their caloric intake is made up of saturated fat, yet their cholesterol intake is small. Their weight rises steadily with age until 45 to 54 and then declines. There is an increase of skinfold-thickness in both sexes. In young adults the serum cholesterol levels range from 184.5-198.2 mg. The serum cholesterol levels rise with age until they peak between 220.4-254.4 mg -- high according to recommended U. S. standards. Triglycerides also increase with age. Blood pressure rises slowly with age. Angina pectoris and myocardial infarction are also present in the population. High cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure promote heart disease, and the Polynesian diet may contribute to premature death.
See also MASAI; NEW GUINEAN HIGHLANDERS; SOLOMON ISLAND TRIBES; SOMALI CAMEL HERDSMEN; TARAHUMARA INDIANS; YANOMANO INDIANS.
Brocklehurst, J. C. Textbook of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. New York: Churchhill Livingstone, 1985.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home